Coin Collector Poem

This was given to me by a little old lady after I purchased her coins.  She found the coins years after her husband passed.  It touched my heart, I think it may touch yours as well.

A rare old coin is a happy find;
Each one added helps content the mind.
Some like copper, nickel, silver, and gold;
I’ll go for anything that’s valuable and old.
Our wives think we are nuts, and sort of dry and lazy;
The security we offer might even seem quite crazy.
They think each time we invest a dollar or maybe ten;
Their wardrobe should be extended and really — to no end.
The poor girls don’t realize, the dough we did save;
Until they plant us deep down in our grave.
And only then, after planted, they will thank us.
For the money we saved,
Our effort soon forgotten for the fine road we have paved.
–Author unknown

Please feel free to print this, share it with your club, and store it with your coins,
Lowcountrycoins1@bellsouth.net
843.763.DIME


About Online Shopping

About Us

We are a Veteran Owned Small Business with over 35K reviews on ebay. To check them out, click here.

Shipping

Your item will ship in a nondescript box or bubble mailer with tracking, signature required, and insurance when necessary.

When ordering multiple items, order them together to save on shipping. Multiple items ordered separately may result in your order being delayed an additional day.

 

Guaranteed Authentic

All our items are 100% Authentic and genuine. We have EXTENSIVE training in counterfeit coins and currency. There is an astronomical amount of counterfeit coins out there. We have intentionally purchased coins directly from China, so that all our employees have them to reference to PREVENT buying them. These coins were used in an actual ANA counterfeit detection class, which was attended by all our employees. We have also won awards for our counterfeit display at coin shows.

Accurate Grading

        

Of course, grading is subjective. It is simply an opinion. You know, everyone has one. We grade strictly in accordance with the ANA Grading Standard. Our Chief Grader, Bill, finished in the top of the ANA Summer Seminar Advanced Grading Class. This class is taught by senior graders at PCGS, NGC, and ANACS. He is also an authorized dealer for these grading services.

Terms & Conditions

  • Item Availability - Please note that we have a retail coin shop, an e-commerce site, and attend an average of two coin shows a month. Sometimes our inventory gets sold locally, and we don’t have a chance to remove it from the site yet. If that happens, we will immediately refund your money. We are literally a small three employee business.
  • Postage - Most of our listings have free shipping. Please bear in mind that our postal charges include actual postage costs, and packaging which is AT LEAST $5 per package. We do not ship internationally, as we had too many "lost packages".
  • Dispatch Times - We normally ship your order via First Class Mail within one day of payment. Unless we are at a show, then the next business day. Once your order has shipped, the tracking information will be automatically uploaded into your eBay account. Your item will probably take up to five days for delivery. We ship thousands of coins a year, about 2% take up to 3-4 weeks. USPS will NOT update the item location in transit, do not expect them to. If the item is lost in the mail (this happens in less than 1% of shipments), we will refund your purchase price. We abide by the USPS definition for a lost item: " not delivered within 30 days of shipment".
  • 100% 14 Day Money Back Guarantee - Most of our items have a NO QUESTIONS ASKED return policy. We really do not mind returns at all. About 1 out of every 100 coins we sell are returned. We do NOT accept returns for certified coins, bullion, or rolls of coins. VERY IMPORTANT: We ONLY accept returns IF and ONLY IF the item has not been removed from the original holder we shipped it in. If you do not love the item, I encourage you to return it.

Our Credentials off

Anyone can tell you the value of a Coin.

It takes the right knowledge and experience to do it honestly.

At our store, all of our employees are either certified or in the process of getting certified by the American Numismatic Association (ANA).

 

Bill Latour:

 

ANA Certified in Advanced Grading of United States Coins and Problem Coins. The course is conducted by the three top Grading companies at the ANA.

 

ANA Certified in Early American Coppers Society

 

American Numismatic Association Life Member (LM-6242)

 

Florida United Numismatists Life Member (LM-970)

 

South Carolina Numismatics Association Life Member (LM-168),

 

North Carolina Numismatics Association Life Member (LM-166)

 

Low Country Coin Club Member since 1989

 

Society of Silver Dollars Collectors Life Member (LM-150).

 

SCNA Executive Board Member (Since 2012)

 

SCNA Bourse Chairman (Since 2018). Which means he runs the largest show in the Carolinas (200+ tables)

 

 

John:

 

Low Country Coin Club Secretary since 2018

 

Low Country Coin Club Member since 2012

 

American Numismatic Association Member since 2013

 

South Carolina Numismatics Association Member since 2019

 

Florida United Numismatists Member since 2014

 

ANA Certified in “Advanced Numismatic Digital Photography”

 

ANA Numismatic Scholar


Numismatic Dictionary 101

 

Have you ever heard or read certain words that you don’t understand? You were unsure to ask because you didn’t want to seem stupid.

Here is a list of some words in the coin industry that you might here. So next time, you will understand what someone is talking about.

 

90%/Junk Silver: coins that are made of a majority of silver, that we sell for the silver value as opposed to the collector’s value

Bars and Rounds: commonly used term to describe Bullion made by a non-government mint (third party). They are not coins, so the only value they have in them is the composition.
Base Metal: an element that is less valuable than a precious metal. Typically, they are used as the majority/core of modern coins.
Bullion: 99% pure (such as Gold or Silver)

 

Circulated: the condition of a coin or note that has everyday wear
Coin: an object that has monetary value to it issued by a government. As opposed to a token. (Examples: Dollar, Pound, Euro, Yuan, and Baht)
Cull: a coin that is very worn and/or damaged, that its only worth is in the composition

 

Die: the stamp that gives a coin its image
Error: a mistake made during the coin making process that is supposedly not repeated. As opposed to a variety.
Exomumia: anything else that is remotely associated with or resembles coins and currency, that is not coin or currency. (Tokens, Novelty Pieces, and Medals)
Face Value: the value of the coin or note that is stated on the coin or note

 

Grading: the process of determining a coin or notes condition. There is a standard that is used in the industry.
“Greysheet”: also known as “Coin Dealer Newsletter (CDN)”. It is a pricing guide that every reputable dealer should be using. It is updated daily with the current market trends.
Intrinsic Value: the worth of something, based on the composition

 

Mint error/variety: an error or variety that is made during the minting process, as opposed to afterwards
Minting process: the way a coin is made

Note: also known as cash or paper money

Numismatics: the study of coins

 

Obverse: the “heads” side of a coin
Precious Metal: an element that is more valuable than an “everyday” element. (Gold, Silver, Platinum, and Palladium)
Premium: the dollar value added to a piece because it is also has a collectors value
Proof: a coin that has a mirror-like surface. They are struck twice, and the dies are heavily polished. Most modern (1971 to present) proof coins will have a “S” or “W” mintmark

 

"Red Book": a guide to U.S. coins. It includes technical information such as: mintage years, composition, weight, names of coins, etc. Even though there are prices in it, it is NOT a price guide. The prices are written months in advance, assuming that is where the market will be. For pricing, we use “Greysheet”.
Relief: the height of the image on a coin
Reverse: the “tails” side of a coin
Spot/Spot Price: the value of a Metal on the market at a specific time. Like the stock market, it can go up and down within seconds.

 

Token: a coin like object which has value not identified by a government. (Gaming, Car Wash, and Mining)
Troy Ounce (toz): unit of measurement of mass used in the world of Bullion, as opposed to an ounce. 1 toz = 1.10 oz
Uncirculated: the condition of a coin or note that has no circulation wear

 

Variety: a mistake made in the coin making process that is repeated. As opposed to an error.
VAM: an acronym for Leroy Van Allen and George Mallis. They spent decades identifying and classifying Morgan and Peace dollar varieties. Every Morgan and Peace has a VAM. Some are common and some are rare. Bill has discovered 42 varieties.

 


WATCH OUT FOR THIS SCAM!

Have you ever seen the TV or newspaper ad about buying “Limited Time Only” or “Only 3 easy payments of $xxx” coins or currency?

Well, I hate to break it to you but, those are SCAMS.

 

Here is an example from an unnamed TV network that sells various items. They are selling a 1923 Peace Dollar. The coin is in an ICG holder with a grade of MS65. It also comes in a small display box. They are offering the following payment plans: One-time $234.95, two payments of $117.48, three payments of $78.32, or four payments of $58.74. Now that may seem reasonable to you if you don’t have anything to compare it too. It is a certified coin that is almost 100 years old, and it also is made of silver.

 

Here is something to compare the price to.

According to the coin dealer pricing guide, it is worth $124. If you add an extra 10% for selling it, the new price would be about $137. Sure, you can add $10 for the display case. That puts your total at $147, excluding shipping. Which in the end, is a price of $88 above the coin dealer guide.

 

Here is a SECOND example from a different unnamed online store.

 

There are also selling a 1923 Peace Dollar, but this time uncertified. They categorized it into their grading system, and priced accordingly: “Very Good” $105, “Fine #2” $96.50, “Fine” $107, “Very Fine #2” $98.50, “Very Fine” $109, “Extra Fine #2” $100, “Extra Fine” $111, “About Uncirculated #2” $103, “About Uncirculated” $114, “Choice About Uncirculated” $117, “Uncirculated” $122, and “Choice Uncirculated” $150.

 

The coin dealer price guide’s prices are: “Very Good 8: $28.25”, “Very Good 10: $28.25”, “Fine 12: $28.25”, “Fine 15: $28.25”, “Very Fine 20: $28.25”, “Very Fine 25: $28.25”, “Very Fine 30: $28.25”, “Very Fine 35: $28.25”, “Extra Fine 40: $30”, “Extra Fine 45: $31”, “Almost Uncirculated 50: $32”, “Almost Uncirculated 53: $32”, “Almost Uncirculated 55: $32”, “Almost Uncirculated 58: $33”, “Mint State 60-64: $35-$60”, “Mint State 65: $124”, “Mint State 66: $380”, and “Mint State 67: $3400”

 

Now if you compare their “Extra Fine: $111” to the price guide’s “Extra Fine 45: $31”, there is a price difference of $80. That is a. How about comparing unnamed store’s “Uncirculated” $122 to the Guide’s “Almost Uncirculated 58: $33”. The price difference here is $89.

 

This is a THIRD unnamed online store.

They are selling colorized state quarters. The prices range from $5.75 to $10.25.

We sell them at Four Times Face value, which means One Quarter would be $1. That equals a over a 500% mark up.

 

FOURTH website, if three examples isn’t enough!

They are selling “America Eagle Replica Precious Metal Coin Set” for $98. There are things to certain things to look out for. The description has more information on what they are replicating than the actual tokens themselves. They also don’t even state what the core of the token is, and only state what they are layered with.

Since the main composition is not mentioned, we can assume that they are made of a common non-expensive metal. Which would put the value of each token about $5.

If we assume the total worth is $15, then that is a $83 upcharge.

 

Watch out for the words layered, plated, gilded, colored, satin, polished, and many more. If they look like a coin, legally they must put the word “Copy” on them, otherwise it would be considered counterfeit.

 

The difference between a token, a replica, and a coin is the issuing agency. Tokens are made by non-government entities such as a local arcade. They are only good for that specific area of issue. Replicas are almost exact physical copies of what they are mimicking. Usually, the compositions are different than the original. With a replica coin, they must put the word “Copy” on it, otherwise it is considered counterfeit.  Coins are issued by governments. They can be used anywhere that accepts that local currency. Depending on the age of the coin it can have multiple values.

 

The face value means the value at which the government issues it at. There is the intrinsic value which means the value is in the composition, such as a 1960 Quarter. And there is the Numismatic value (Collectors). This is usually the highest value associated with coins.

 

Example of 1960 Washington Quarter

 

Face Value: $0.25

Intrinsic Value: ~$4.50 worth of silver

Numismatic Value: $700 in MS67 condition

 

Please spread the word, especially to the elderly. These companies also advertise in senior targeted magazines and newspapers. We don’t want them spending their life savings on a scam.


The ONLY Way To Clean Your Coins.

Yes, you can clean your coins. ONLY under certain conditions though.

 

First of all, DO NOT clean your coins unless something is literally harming it, like a corrosive substance.

 

The most common form of corrosion is ionic corrosion, resulting from chloride contamination. Whether it’s from sweaty skin or the chemical breakdown of aging plastics. There are dozens of cleaning solvents for cleaning coins.

DO NOT USE ANY OF CLEANING SOLVENTS

They all will leave trace chemicals within the pores of the coins that cannot be rinsed off and will eventually cause more corrosion than the coin had in the first place.
Conservation of a coin should only be done when it has an active chloride corrosion in progress.

 

We are NOT liable for any damage done to your items. Follow instructions at your own risk.

 

Here is list of items you will need:
The Coin
Non-metallic tongs
Wax paper
Freezer
Boiling water
Microfiber or soft cloth

 

Again, do not use any coin cleaners!

 

Step 1: Ensure the coin is completely dry by placing it under a heated lamp. Each side of the coin should be under the lamp for 15 minutes.

 

Step 2: Place the coin on a piece of wax paper, and then place it in your freezer overnight. The wax paper prevents the coin from freezing to the frost layer in the freezer. Freezing the coin contracts the metal and embrittles the mechanical bonding of the crud on the surfaces of the coin.

 

Step 3: Microwave or boil water. You can use de-ionized water, but it is not necessary for this step. Set the hot water to the side until all the boiling stops, and all bubbles stop forming. Bubbles can strip the surface of the coin if they collapse when in contact with the coin.

 

Step 4: Using a pair of non-metallic spaghetti tongs, take the coin directly from the freezer to the hot water. The rapid re-expansion of the coin from the thermal shock helps to further break the contaminants mechanical bonds to the coin. After holding the coin in the water for 20 seconds, you can remove the coin and gently set it on a clean surface. At this point you can dab the coin with a Q-tip to remove loose contaminants. DO NOT WIPE THE COIN with the Q-tip or any cloth, as the cotton can scratch the surface of the coin.

 

Step 5. Dab off any remaining moisture, with a microfiber or soft cloth, then place the coin under a heated lamp. Each side should be under the lamp for 15 minutes to fully dry the surface and pores of the coin.

 

Step 6. Inspect the coin for contaminants and crud. If still present, repeat steps 1 through 5 above. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO FORCIBLY REMOVE ANY CRUD with anything. Even the use of a cut Q-tip or turkey feather can scratch the coin or abrade the coin surface under the crud.

 

In our experience, minor chloride corrosion (sticky feel and/or snotty light green color) will be fully removed by this process in one or two cycles, without impacting the original patina of the coin. Coins with carbon crud may take 3 or 4 cycles. If they have heavy thick crud, it may take as many as 10 cycles.

 

In the end, the coin will be much ‘cleaner’ without having used any harmful coin cleaners.


About Us

About Us

We are a Veteran Owned Small Business with over 35K reviews on ebay. To check them out, click here.

Shipping

Your item will ship in a nondescript box or bubble mailer with tracking, signature required, and insurance when necessary.

When ordering multiple items, order them together to save on shipping. Multiple items ordered separately may result in your order being delayed an additional day.

 

 Guaranteed Authentic

All our items are 100% Authentic and genuine. We have EXTENSIVE training in counterfeit coins and currency. There is an astronomical amount of counterfeit coins out there. We have intentionally purchased coins directly from China, so that all our employees have them to reference to PREVENT buying them. These coins were used in an actual ANA counterfeit detection class, which was attended by all our employees. We have also won awards for our counterfeit display at coin shows.

Accurate Grading

Of course, grading is subjective. It is simply an opinion. You know, everyone has one. We grade strictly in accordance with the ANA Grading Standard. Our Chief Grader, Bill, finished in the top of the ANA Summer Seminar Advanced Grading Class. This class is taught by senior graders at PCGS, NGC, and ANACS. He is also an authorized dealer for these grading services.

Terms & Conditions

  • Item Availability – Please note that we have a retail coin shop, an e-commerce site, and attend an average of two coin shows a month. Sometimes our inventory gets sold locally, and we don’t have a chance to remove it from the site yet. If that happens, we will immediately refund your money. We are literally a small three employee business.
  • Postage – Most of our listings have free shipping. Please bear in mind that our postal charges include actual postage costs, and packaging which is AT LEAST $5 per package. We do not ship internationally, as we had too many “lost packages”.
  • Dispatch Times – We normally ship your order via First Class Mail within one day of payment. Unless we are at a show, then the next business day. Once your order has shipped, the tracking information will be automatically uploaded into your eBay account. Your item will probably take up to five days for delivery. We ship thousands of coins a year, about 2% take up to 3-4 weeks. USPS will NOT update the item location in transit, do not expect them to. If the item is lost in the mail (this happens in less than 1% of shipments), we will refund your purchase price. We abide by the USPS definition for a lost item: ” not delivered within 30 days of shipment”.
  • 100% 14 Day Money Back Guarantee – Most of our items have a NO QUESTIONS ASKED return policy. We really do not mind returns at all. About 1 out of every 100 coins we sell are returned. We do NOT accept returns for certified coins, bullion, or rolls of coins. VERY IMPORTANT: We ONLY accept returns IF and ONLY IF the item has not been removed from the original holder we shipped it in. If you do not love the item, I encourage you to return it.

 

 


Interested In Investing In Gold?

If so, here is some information to make sure you are making the right choice.

 

Here are a few things to know:

 

The 20 – 100 rule applies when gold pricing is relatively steady. $20 over spot for 1/10th oz and $100 over for 1 oz gold coins and bullion.
When gold is trending slowly upwards, this rule becomes 30 – 150.
When gold is forecast to rise faster, this rule becomes 50 – 200.
When gold is sinking, this rule becomes 20 – 80.

 

Don’t be afraid of higher premiums for certified, and reputably graded raw (uncertified) collectible gold coins. The premium should carry-over when you sell them. However, as with any collectible coin, make sure the dealer proves to you the authenticity, grade, and value (using “CDN Greysheet” or recent actual verifiable sales records on-line) of the coin.

 

A significant number of U.S. Gold coins pre-1930 are counterfeits. Ensure the dealer proves to you the authenticity of the coin using “United States Gold Counterfeit Detection Guide”. If the dealer does not have this reference for authentication, of raw gold coins, do NOT purchase the coin.

 

Have the dealer demonstrate the use of a spectrometer for testing the gold, and verify it is used for the coin you would like to purchase. This ensures you are not being sold a plated counterfeit. If they don’t have one, don’t buy the coin.

 

Get a receipt and ensure the receipt contains the dealer’s contact information, and accurately describes what you are purchasing.


Why 90% Silver?

What is 90% silver?

 

It is the old halves, quarters, and dimes. The cut-off date is anything 1964 and before. The amount of silver in each is proportional. A quarter has 2.5 times the amount of silver in a dime. The half dollar has twice the amount of silver in a quarter.

 

While the extreme vast majority of dealers across the country sell 90% silver at a 25% - 30% premium,

 

LOW COUNTRY COINS only charges a 25%* premium above Spot (stock market) value.

 

The 25%* is variable and is typically 2%* less than the largest precious metals companies would pay you for it.

 

This is also 6% - 7%* below what they sell it to the public for. Why? By selling directly to the public, it saves us the registered mail shipping and the insurance charges commensurate with the heavy packing.

 

Spot: per troy ounce (the value at that moment)
Intrinsic Metal Value: worth based on the composition

 

We sell it in face value (FV) bags of $10 (20 halves, 40 quarters, and 100 dimes).

 

This is how we calculate our 90% silver prices:
Spot x 0.715 = intrinsic silver value of $1 FV

 

Your cost would be, Spot x 0.715 x 1.25* x FV
At LOW COUNTRY COINS, that is all you pay, whether cash or debit.

 

For example, assuming Spot is $25, a $10 FV bag would cost:
$25 x 0.715 x 1.25* x $10 = $223.43 = $224

 

Why 0.715 toz? One dollar face value of new Silver 90% coins weighs 0.72234 toz regardless of the combination of dimes, quarters and halves used. That value was used industry wide through 2007, whether or not the coins were circulated. In 2007, we weighed 5000 circulated mercury dimes and calculated the 0.715 toz. We began using the circulated weight value for all 90% coinage. Most all of the industry has since followed suit.

*values subject to change based on market conditions